THE WISDOM OF MANJUSHRI AND THE HOLLOW FRUITY PLEASURES OF SAMSARA. Sakya master Lama Dampa Gyeltsen’s Letter to Student, taught by Avikrita Vajra Rinpoche

“All the most important teachings, all the most important practices, all of them of the Sakya tradition, come through him. Like the Lamdre, Vajrayogini, Vajrakila and so on. So, his writings are highly regarded for elucidating the teachings of the Sakya founding masters.”

“That’s why we also call seeming peak moments dukkha too. Because although of course they feel good while they last, the fact that they don’t ever last, and are contingent on causes and conditions, means that the bliss that they afford is hollow. So, no matter how much energy, no matter how much cleverness that we put into trying to manipulate samsara to make us feel cozy, to make us feel comfortable and safe, no matter how long we try to do that, no matter how long we seem to succeed in that, we are ultimately just kidding ourselves because we’re not in control when we are compelled by karma.”

—HE Avikrita Vajra Rinpoche

“Compelled by many different desires, I hurt my parents and the rest of my loved ones, as well as my friends, and spoil my own bliss with even those who have been reliable friends. For a long time, for an insignificant reason and no real cause, I think it’s okay to be a little bit angry.”

“In short, making the unwholesome state escalate, the compulsive beings of samsara do not rely on the holy dharma. So never have the chance for bliss.”

–Lama Dampa Gyaltsen’s letter to Tenpa Gyeltsen

Today, 14th January 2023, I saw a notice commemorating the lives of several Sakya masters, and realised that (other than the Jamyang Khyentse lineage which stems from Sakya here, and the Sakya Jetsunmas, here) I have not written so much about the vast and amazing heritage of the Sakya. I also plan to write more about the Ngor lineage of Sakya, in particular, after the recent passing of Ngor Luding Khenchen Rinpoche, for whom the Ngor mandala rituals are now being conducted in various Sakya monasteries and nunneries .

So, following the Tārā teaching given to the Great Sakya Pandita, Kunga Gyeltsen (January 6th 2023), I was watching some Youtube videos by HE Avikrita Vajra Rinpoche (always good not only for practical and interesting Dharma teachings but also for a belly-ache laugh) and came across this teaching given in 2021 on a letter written by the 14th Sakya Trizin, Lama Dampa Gyeltsan. Sönam Gyaltsen, the Sakya Lama Dampa ( bsod nams rgyal mtshan sa skya pa bla ma dam pa, 16 May 1312 – 23 July 1375), who is considered the greatest Sakya scholar of the 14th century and served as ruler of Tibet for a short term in 1344–1347[i]. He wrote the letter to his student, Tenpa Gyeltsen.

In addition, today is the first day of the online teachings of HH 17th Gyalwang Karmapa on the Thirty Verses by Vasubhandu (I wrote about last year’s teaching on that text here). At the beginning of the teaching Rinpoche explains the way to listen to Dharma teachings properly, as an upright cup without leaks and not too full or dirty. This teaching seems particularly suitable to share for that reason too.

First, I give a little background on Lama Dampa Sonam Gyeltsen, some background to the text and then the transcript of the teaching itself.

The teaching began with how Lama Dampa first paid homage to Manjushri in his text and the importance of not only method (compassion/bliss) but also wisdom. They need to be united. It then moved onto the importance of listening correctly to teachings and how to do that. Then, the reasons why we suffer and how suffering (dukkha) is not just about selfishiness, but the very nature of existence and phenomena in samsara itself. 

The second part of the teaching was continued a year afterwards here, (with a very fetching pair of fingerless gloves on :-))

To end with some music, as is the tradition on here, some of Rinpoche’s favourite songs (as cited at the end of this interview here): Katy Perry Firework, Pehli Nazar Mein by Atif Aslam , I’ve Got You Under My Skin by Frank Sinatra, and it was all going so well, until he mentioned the Backstreet Boys, just kidding, smile and say ‘cheese’ and play I Want It That Way

Written and transcribed by Adele Tomlin on 14th January 2023.

Lama Dampa Sonam Gyeltsen (1312 – 1375)
14th Sakya Trizin, Lama Dampa Gyeltsan. Sönam Gyaltsen, the Sakya Lama Dampa ( bsod nams rgyal mtshan sa skya pa bla ma dam pa, 1312 – 1375)

In his teaching. Avikrita Rinpoche first explained that:

“All the most important teachings, all the most important practices, all of them of the Sakya tradition, come through him, like the Lamdre, Vajrayogini, Vajrakila and so on. So, his writings are highly regarded for elucidating the teachings of the Sakya founding masters.”

According to online biographies, Sonam Gyaltsen, usually just known by his title, “Lama Dampa”, was one of the thirteen sons of the abbot-ruler (dansa chenpo) Zangpo Pal who governed the see from 1306 to 1323 and therefore had a key position in the politics of Tibet under the overlordship of the Yuan emperor[ii].

 Lama Dampa was the author of the famous genealogy, The Clear Mirror: A Royal Genealogy (rgyal rabs sal ba’i me long). His writings on the Lamdre (lam ‘bras) tradition were collected in a volume called the Lamdre Ponag (lam ‘bras pod nag), one of the first major written works on Lamdre. He also wrote a commentary on Shantideva’s Bodhicharyavatara and sponsored the first edition of the collected works of the Five Patriarchs of Sakya (sa skya gong ma lnga).

Dolpopa Sherab Gyalten (dol po pa shes rab rgyal mtshan, 1292-1361)

Lama Dampa is credited with requesting Dolpopa Sherab Gyalten (dol po pa shes rab rgyal mtshan, 1292-1361) to write one his more influential works, the Fourth Council (bka’ bsdu bzhi pa). Some time, between 1352 and 1355, Lama Dampa visited with Dolpopa at Jonang Monastery (jo nang dgon) where the two engaged in extensive discussions on zhentong (gzhan stong).

As I am very interested in this particular view of emptiness, zhentong (Empty-of-Other) and the Jonang view of it, as taught by Dolpopa and Tārānatha, I was not so aware of Lama Dampa’s noted influence on Dolpopa in that respect. Definitely a topic of future research and focus it seems!

Longchenpa Rabjam (1308-1364)

According to the Treasury of Lives biography:

“Sonam Gyeltsen was a master in the Ngok lineage (rngog lugs) of the Prajñāpāramitā. His students included Rendawa Zhonnu Lodro (red mda’ ba gzhon nu blo gros, 1349-1412); Tsongkhapa Lobzang Drakpa (tsong kha pa blo bzang grags pa, 1357-1419) whom he taught at Nyetang (snye thang); and Longchenpa Rabjam Drime Ozer (klong chen pa rab ‘byams pa dri med ‘od zer, 1308-1364). He also taught and conferred initiations on Tai Situ Changchub Gyeltsen, the military and political figure whose reign initiated the Pakmodrupa (phag mo dru pa) Dynasty that supplanted Sakya-Mongol rule in Tibet.”

THE COLLECTED WORKS OF LAMA DAMPA AND THE TEXT

The letter is said to be contained in the Collected Works of Lama Dampa (gSung ʼbum bsod nams rgyal mtshan). There are four Collected Works editions available on BDRC:

  1. 7-volume U-med edition. Buddhist Digital Resource Center (BDRC), purl.bdrc.io/resource/W3CN2635.

2. 6-volume edition  (sa skya rgyal yongs gsung rab slob gnyer khang gi glog klad par ma). Sa skya rgyal yongs gsung rab slob gnyer khang, 2007. Buddhist Digital Resource Center (BDRC), purl.bdrc.io/resource/W1KG11900.

3. From a micro-film. 9 v. only (vol. kha, cha, and ja are missing) Buddhist Digital Resource Center (BDRC), purl.bdrc.io/resource/MW00KG02390.

4. 26-volume edition computer input U-chen edition (Bod ljongs bod yig dpe rnying dpe skrun khang, 2016. Buddhist Digital Resource Center (BDRC), purl.bdrc.io/resource/MW3CN3409).

As Avikrita Rinpoche did not say the actual name of the text in Tibetan, I did a little research online but was unable to find the text with the name Tenpa Gyaltsen. If anyone can help with that, please let me know!

There is a text though called The Questions and Answers of Choje Lama Dampa and Tawenpa (Chos rje bla ma dam pas ta dben paʼi zhu lan du mdzad pa.) gSung ʼbum bsod nams rgyal mtshan, vol. 12, pp. 35–41. Buddhist Digital Resource Center (BDRC), purl.bdrc.io/resource/MW00KG02390_67FF55.  Tawen is referring to the 15th Sakya Trizin, who was a student of Lama Dampa.

 

LAMA DAMPA SONAM GYELTSEN’S LETTER TO STUDENT
TRANSCRIPT OF TEACHING BY HE AVIKRITA VAJRA RINPOCHE


“Today, I thought I would share some reflections on a letter of dharma advice that one of our ancestors wrote to a disciple. It’s not such a long letter and the advice in it is very practical, summing up all  the key points that we all need to focus on to cultivate the Mahayana path to full awakening. Although it was written a long time ago, it’s still very relevant for all of us to read and reflect on upon today.

So, our ancestor who wrote this letter is the 14th century master Lama Dampa Sonam Gyeltsen. He succeeded his elder brother to be Sakya Trizin and for a time was nominal ruler of Tibet. However, everyone called him lama Dampa, which means holy guru because he was totally uninterested in politics. In fact, he was guru to the political leaders, as well as the spiritual leaders of all the different traditions in Tibet like Je Tsongkhapa,  Longchen Rabjampa and many other lamas so this was because he was an incredibly erudite scholar and accomplished yogi. All the most important teachings, all the most important practices, all of them of the Sakya of tradition, come through him. Like the Lamdre, Vajrayogini, Vajrakila and so on. So, his writings are highly regarded for elucidating the teachings of the Sakya founding masters.

Homage to Mañjuśrī – importance of wisdom in union with method

In his collective works is an anthology of letters he wrote in reply to his students’ Dharma questions, some short prayers and other writings. Today, we’re looking at the letter from this anthology that he wrote to a disciple called Tenpa Gyeltsen. The letter begins with a preface in the form of a homage which is the custom in Buddhist writings. Here the focus of homage is Mañjuśrī, the bodhisattva of wisdom. As it says in the  Mañjuśrī-Nāma-Saṃgīti, he is the master most powerful and prosperous in the ten levels, which means he has gone through all the bodhisattva levels through the five paths out of great compassion. Having reached the path of no more learning is the most senior to the eighth closest bodhisattva sun-like disciples of the Buddha. Embodying all the quality all the enlightened ones, perfect complete knowledge. So, since Mañjuśrī has all the enlightened qualities, but particularly the knowledge that understands the way things are and how they are, which we aspire to gain from our studies and implementation and so on, based on great compassion, then Mañjuśrī is the perfect examplar to pay homage to at the beginning of Je Lama Dampa’s composition. Particularly for us, when studying his holy counsel. 

Mañjuśrī with consort, Saraswati

Actually, we know from his hagiography, that Je Lama Dampa would always recite our prayer to Mañjuśrī before writing anything on Dharma. Such as Palden Lodroma (?) by Sakya Paṇḍita. Reciting prayers focused on Mañjuśrī like that, can have a real impact on developing skill in intellect and articulation. Not by expecting a divine being who looks like a handsome prince to float down and blast genius into our brains by magic, or something. Rather by inspiring the development of. wisdom that turns aspiring bodhisattvas into actual Bodhisattvas. In that way every day, we will become closer and closer to realizing Mañjuśrī within us. So, as it says in the opening verse of homage, Manjushri embodies enlightened knowledge and all the other qualities. As we explored in the aspiration for success, we need the aspiring bodhichitta that wishes to attain the stage of buddha, to attain Buddhahood for the sake of saving all sentient beings from suffering. Also, the engaging bodhichitta which consists of the six transcendent perfections, wisdom being the sixth. So, the other qualities mentioned here. include the first five which are generosity, morality, patience, joyful vigor, and dhyana. How do we set out in developing Mañjuśrī’s qualities that we emulate? As it says here:

“Having bowed to the undefiled lotus feet of Mañjuśrī to increase one’s own and others virtues, one must listen with a respectful attitude to the essential meaning of the victorious ones’ discourses condensed into an upadesha to be cherished.”

Listening for the right reason and in the right way

When one focuses on a purpose to attain personal liberation, one is practicing to develop only one’s own purpose with a limited subsidiary benefit for others. When one focuses on the practices to attain total liberation, which means complete Buddhahood, then we fulfill our own and everyone else’s welfare without limits, which we call the two purposes. So, it’s for those two purposes that we are studying this teaching on the essence of Mahayana practice. The Buddha who was victorious over every affliction and confusion is said to have given 84 000 dharma teachings but here Je Lama Dampa has condensed them into just a few pages of essential advice. So, we must really relate to them in the right way, not just for intellectual curiosity but cherishing them, which means taking the meaning into our hearts and practicing to gain fulfilment.

There’s an important distinction to be aware here, between how we relate to a presentation of Buddhist theory, be this Buddhist theory or science, and how we relate to practical instructions. So, although for practitioners we contextualize theory or an abstract presentation of Buddhist science and psychology for our practice, for example, by analyzing what appears as a non-evident phenomena at first, to then integrate in meditation, so that it can be directly perceived as evident. Yet, the way we do this is through analysis, critical analysis, just as someone who isn’t a practitioner could do. This means that we are in no way expected to relate to every teacher, every teaching unquestioningly, as an instruction to be followed.  

A practical Mahayāna instruction is different for those who have entered the Mahayāna path. It is intended for practitioners who are applying the science and psychology that we have analyzed. So for such teachings it’s less about why, but more about how and when. So, the teacher must possess a degree of learning and experience and those receiving the teachings set the ideal mode in which to listen to the teachings.

The classic analogy we use for this is a pot for filling water to drink. If the pot’s upside down, then we can pour all the water we like but it can never be filled. Similarly, if an instruction is being given but we’re not really listening because we’re wandering off internally, thinking about this and that, then we’re not really listening, then we cannot absorb any benefit from it. Then turn the pot the right way up and give our full attention, but if the pot has holes in it, well similarly, if we receive the instructions but don’t contemplate the meaning, it’s like the water pours in and then seeps out again. So, the benefits don’t last. If the pot is the right way up and intact, but there is undrinkable stuff in the pot, well then if we fill it with pure spring water, it’ll be wasted. So likewise, if we have ulterior motives, negative perceptions and so on, then it’s like the content is sullied in our minds and wasted again. So, if the pot is the right way up, intact and unsullied, then it will hold pure water and serve to quench our thirst. In the same way, if we listen with fullness of energy and attention, if we absorb the process, the meaning through contemplation, and if our motivation is genuinely altruistic and faithful, definitely our hearts will be sated by the dharma, and everything that grows from it, will be pure and wholesome.

Negative mental states as ‘kindling wood for the fire’ of suffering and dissatisfaction

Next, it says:

“Despite being unstable and having no essence, appearing as infallibly real ,samsara is like a plantain tree.

 Due to the world thirsting for its comforts, grasping me and mine, gives rise to the tribe of passion, aggression and delusion.

 By pride, jealousy and the rest of the afflictions creating non-virtuous karma, this person is tormented just like kindling wood by the flames, by the never-ending suffering of samsara  circling in painful existence for such a long time.”

What we call samsara is the compulsive cycle of being that has highs and lows, but no matter how high it can be, it is by nature compelled by our karma. It is conditioned, it cannot provide unconditioned lasting, safety; lasting comfort or peace. In that way, it’s compared to a plant; a plant that bears fruit but is hollow. In this way, the whole science of dependent co-arising is condensed.

The reflection here is not about a merely literal interpretation of suffering which is evident, but the broader meaning of what is termed duḥkha (Pāli: dukkha) in Sanskrit. In the broader sense, dukkha means pain, suffering, stress but also dissatisfaction. That is why we also call seemingly peak moments dukkha too. Although of course they feel good while they last, the fact that they don’t ever last, and are contingent on causes and conditions, means that the bliss that they afford us is hollow. So, no matter how much energy, no matter how much cleverness that we put into trying to manipulate samsara to make us feel cozy, comfortable and safe, no matter how long we try to do that, no matter how long we seem to succeed in doing that, we are ultimately just kidding ourselves because we’re not in control when we are compelled by karma. When we don’t fully see this, when we presume our perception of the real world can’t budge despite being based on a mistaken notion of reality, we thirst, we crave for an outer happiness; an outer happiness and security despite there really being no permanent happiness and security out there.

So instead of looking out there, we are encouraged to stop chasing, stop running, stop looking out there, and look inside. This is because it’s only inside that we can uproot the mis-knowing that causes physical, verbal and mental karma that drives this wheel of samsara on and on. In English, people normally say Buddhist, but in Tibetan language we usually call ourselves nangpa, which literally means those who look inwards. So, looking inwards means we don’t look outwards and project an internal belief onto our experiences, like “I wish it was otherwise but oh well, it’s all impermanent. It’s all empty anyway so everything is dukkha, so I’ll just push it all the way.” That’s the thing about compulsive cycle of samsara. When we try to push them away. When we try to push karmic effects away, they have a habit of coming back again, like a boomerang because the causes are still there. Similarly, our approach to this can be trying to run away but we just end up coming back right to where we started.

The end of compulsion, the uprooting of suffering is here and now.  So, we stop running we stop looking outside and we really look. This isn’t ignoring, or pushing away anything, but it’s about recognizing that everything we experience is experienced in the mind. They appear to the mind, but if what appears, appears as solid and permanent when it’s not, well then we have work to do on the inside. So, here we’re directed to target the cognitive dissonance that antagonizes all the different afflictive emotions that in turn cause us to act out unskilfully. The three root afflictions are described and the examples of the many different negative emotional tones that spring from them, they’re often called the three poisons because of how detrimental they are to well-being and enlightenment. It is important to remember this because on the evident level we recognize how anger, how jealousy and so on, would lead us to act unskillfully towards others and therefore bring pain to them. 

Being deeply conscientious of karma means that we recognize how negative emotions and karma cause suffering in samsara, first and foremost to ourselves. So, here Je Lama Dampa describes the negative emotions and karma as kindling wood for the fire of suffering that hurts us. However, as a Mahayāna practitioner, as Mahayāna practitioners determined to heal this dynamic for all sentient beings without exception, once and for all, we can’t just replace negative emotions and karma with positive ones if that’s still in samsara. The higher the higher happier levels follow the positive kind but that’s still in the wheel of life and impermanent and conditioned. So, it cannot fulfill the two purposes long term. Of course, we want to invest fully in positive body, speech and mind to bring good results individually and collectively but for liberation, for permanent, unconditioned peace, unconditional happiness we need to break that chain the chain by targeting the root of the problem.

So, next it says:

“Although I want comfort for myself, I am overwhelmed by mis-knowing.  So, I exert myself in the cause of intolerable suffering and so for ages the causes for gaining comfort, which are the opportunities for virtue are ruined too. “

So due to the root mis-knowing of the way things are the afflictive emotions cause us to act out unskillfully. As practitioners. It’s not that we want to, but we don’t catch ourselves doing it. We neglect, we forget to integrate mindfulness, or our insight haven’t yet penetrated deeply enough in our mind. So when that happens although it is physical, verbal and mental virtue that causes us the comfort we want, we end up jeopardizing it. Not only that, in order to have the opportunity to do good, be comfortable, and practice the dharma in the future, it is also virtue that is the key. Right now, at this time, we have the perfect opportunity to do good, we are comfortable, we can practice the dharma in whatever way we want.

So, it’s vital that we make virtue key but not just for a future in samsara, that’s still ultimately unsatisfactory. So, to use our perfect opportunity here and now for temporal and ultimate happiness, we need to conjoin merit and wisdom, which means a total commitment to virtue is the basis for our study, contemplation and meditation to overcome this root, overcome mis-knowing. So, when we awaken wisdom we don’t we don’t need to act like we’re allergic to experiences that foster afflictions, or feel guilt-stricken for eating chocolates, or getting annoyed when the wi-fi is not working or something. No, because we understand their true nature but provisionally, sure we apply restraint to prevent escalation of afflictions and negative karma, which is what we call skillful means.  Ultimately, however, it is only our own wisdom that can set us free from all karma and suffering. So, we must unite provisional method and ultimate wisdom.

The importance of mindfulness and vigilance with our mental states

Now this is in no way just for our own benefit when we apply this to the context of the Mahayāna path. As it goes on to say:

“Compelled by many different desires, I hurt my parents and the rest of my loved ones, as well as my friends, and spoil my own bliss with even those who have been reliable friends. For a long time, for an insignificant reason and no real cause, I think it’s okay to be a little bit angry.”

So, this encourages us to see how we need vigilance, with our feelings and with our intentions, with the potential actions coming from them in terms of how others are affected too.  Starting with our family and friends. It’s all too easy to complain that our situation isn’t supportive enough like  “I try practicing patience with him, but he just doesn’t listen.” Or “If I don’t raise my voice, she doesn’t take me seriously.” Or “if they would meditate more maybe they  they won’t be so annoying.”  All those things. But we’re not expecting samsara to make it easy to practice compassion, to practice patience and all and so on. We practice with what we have got and don’t try to use outer conditions to justify any afflictions that arise, rather we transform any adversity to our advantage through our commitment to train the mind for the two purposes. This comes back to the theme of being with what we are feeling, not stuck in it. Therefore, empowering our ability to respond, rather than react and this is a practice. So, of course, we’re going to make mistakes sometimes. It’s a way of being that we have to familiarize ourselves with thorough practice.  Not just as an intellectual ideal but through a direct, intuitive wisdom that we can gain from meditating. Not just formal meditation sessions but integrated mindfulness in our daily life too. Such as through our interactions.

Wanting to be praised and liked, or to escape difficult situations

So, the different desires mentioned here that compel us, doesn’t mean just selfish desires, for getting our own way and feeling gratified. The Buddha taught that there’s desires that relate to the senses just as wanting to see, hear, taste favorable things, and in turn we want to avoid the unpleasant experiences through the senses. Yet, when we talk about the sixth sense within, which is mental consciousness, then the Buddha talked about not wanting to be someone in a kind of escapist or nihilist way. So, the other two desires wanting an idealized identity, or to not have to be conscious at all to avoid painful impingement, they can be subtle, but they can be just as dominating as our conditioning and all the different forms of desire that condition our experiences influence how we act.

So, without training our minds in wisdom and compassion we could do, say and think reckless things even to those that we care about due to this conditioning process. So, this is why we need an integrated approach of learning, contemplative exercises ,meditative experiences to gain insight and free ourselves from this conditioning. As we have pointed out, here this isn’t just to ease the stress that can come our way right now, but for total freedom from the conditioning for suffering in samsara, which is why we consider the things that would usually antagonize afflictions insignificant reasons, when we have the broader spiritual perspective.

No chance for real bliss

“In short, making the unwholesome state escalate, the compulsive beings of samsara do not rely on the holy dharma. So never have the chance for bliss.”

 Again, this applies to this and every lifetime and all those who haven’t yet sought the way to liberation and enlightenment. Since we’re focused on the two purposes, we cannot be free while sentient beings who have been our mothers, our loved ones in previous lives are still suffering. So we need to utilize the dharma, to create the chance for lasting peace, lasting happiness for everyone.

Then that leads to the topic of bodhichitta. So, I think we will pause there and we can continue exploring the sacred letter in the next video. Until then everybody stay safe, stay well and keep flourishing in the dharma thank you.”

 

FURTHER READING/SOURCES

van der Kuijp, Leonard. 1993. “Fourteenth Century Tibetan Culture III: The Oeuvre of Bla ma dam pa Bsod nams rgyal mtshan (1312-1375).” Berliner Indologische Studien vol. 7, pp. 109-147.

van der Kuijp, Leonard. 1994. “Fourteenth Century Tibetan Cultural History 1: Ta’i sit u Byang-chub rgyal-mtshan as a man of religion.” Indo-Iranian Journal, vol 37 number 2, pp. 139-149.


[i] His mother was Machig Shonnu Bum. His original name was Nyima Dewa’i Lotro; he received the name Sönam Gyaltsen when he was ordained as a novitiate monk in 1328. In 1331, at 19 years of age, he became a fully-ordained monk.

By this time, the power of the Sakya Monastery was in decline. Around the time of Zangpo Pal’s demise in 1323, his numerous sons were divided into four branches residing in different palaces. Lama Dampa belonged to the Rinchengang branch which took power as upper rulers of Sakya after a clash in 1341. He succeeded his elder brother Jamyang Donyo Gyaltsen on his demise in 1344. Temporal administration of Tibet was handled by the dpon-chen Gyalwa Zangpo (1344-1347).

[ii] It is said that Lama Dampa Sönam Gyaltsen, was an acclaimed master of masters whose teachings are the speciality of the Dzongpa lineage of the Sakya tradition. His Eminence Gongkar Dorje Denpa Rinpoche is the Head Lama of this lineage.

His Eminence Gongkar Dorjee Dhenpa Rinpoche (Tenzin Jampel Lungtok Namgyal), the current throneholder of the Dzongpa lineage of the Sakya tradition of Tibetan Buddhism was born in 1977 in Arunachal Pradesh, India. Recognised as the reincarnation of the renowned scholar-saint Dorjee Dhenpa Kunga Namgyal in 1989, he graduated from Sakya College in 1999. In addition to receiving the vast empowerments, transmissions and teachings of the Lamdre, the Compendium of Tantras, the Compendium of Sadhanas, the Naro Khechari Teachings, and countless other collections from H.H. the 41st Sakya Trichen and other illustrious Sakyapa masters, he holds the Kachupa degree (equivalent of B.A.) and Acharya degree (equivalent of M.A.), and has undergone extensive retreats.

He was enthroned in 2003 by His Holiness the 41st Sakya Trichen at the newly build Gongkar Choede Monastery in India and ever since has taken the full responsibility for the revival of his lineage, teaching widely overseas. See: https://www.paramita.org/evento/the-awakening-of-love-and-wisdom/

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s